Turkish Archives of Pediatrics
Original Article

Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in children: A single-center experience

1.

Department of Child Health and Diseases, Department of Child Neurology, Ege University School of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey

2.

Department of Radiology, Ege University School of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey

3.

Department of Child Health and Diseases, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey

Turk Arch Pediatr 2021; 56: 236-244
DOI: 10.5152/TurkArchPediatr.2021.20073
Read: 257 Downloads: 76 Published: 30 April 2021

Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the patients with a diagnosis of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in terms of clinical findings, etiology and underlying risk factors, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis in the long term.

Materials and Methods: Medical records of 19 patients whose ages ranged between 0 days and 17 years with clinical and radiological cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in Ege University Department of Child Neurology were retrospectively evaluated.

Results: Nine of nineteen cases were female (47.3%). The median age was 84 months (0-201 months). The most common complaint at the presentation was headache (n=12) and the most common physical examination finding was papilledema (n=11). In etiology, otitis/mastoiditis in three cases, iron deficiency anemia in three cases, sinusitis in two cases, catheter use in four cases, Behçet’s disease in three cases were determined. The most common observed genetic factors causing thrombosis was methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutation. The transverse sinus (68.4%) is the sinus where thrombosis is most frequently observed. As a result of an average follow-up of 12 months (2-72 months), hemiparesis (n=3/19, 15.7%) and epilepsy (n=5/19, 26.3%) were recorded as sequelae findings, and no mortality was observed.

Conclusion: In cases presenting with headache, evaluation of papilledema on funduscopic examination should not be skipped. Neurological imaging should be performed in the change of consciousness of poor feeding infants and children with infections in the head and neck area or underlying chronic diseases. When cerebral sinovenous thrombosis is detected, anticoagulant therapy should be started immediately.

Cite this article as: Dokurel İD, Eraslan C, Şimşek E, et al. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in children: A single-center experience. Turk Arch Pediatr 2021; 56(3): 236-44.

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